Ready to Rumble

by Talia Simmer | Class of 2024 | Dec. 8, 2020

   This is the first time in five years that a female is taking the mats and joining Hudson High School’s wrestling team.

   As a kid, freshman Emmalee Sharar idolized her older brother, Justin Huey (Hudson Class of 2015). She went to every one of his meets and matches, and it piqued her interest in the sport.

   “When I watched him wrestle, I felt like I was in his shoes,” said Sharar.

   She continued to love wrestling throughout her childhood. “I thought about joining a team a couple times, but it’s a really intimidating decision,” admits Sharar. “Once I even joined for a week before the nerves got to me and I quit.”

   In the end, it was her brother who played a big part in encouraging Sharar to go for it.

   “We talked, and he encouraged me to take that risk,” said Sharar. “Without him, I might not have been able to make the decision to (do it).”

   As one can imagine, being the only female wrestler on a team comes with its fair share of obstacles.

 

   “There’s definitely a lot of pressure and anxiety,” said Sharar, “but I know I shouldn't let that stop me from doing something I

enjoy.” As a female in a male-dominant sport, she had doubts about fitting in both on & off the mat. “I really want people to see me as a part of the team too,” said Sharar. “I don’t want to be underestimated.”

   Wayne Haskovec, who’s been head coach at Hudson for 13 years, wasn’t phased to have a female on the team. After all, Sharar is his third female wrestler. On day one of practice, she may have been nervous, but Haskovec couldn’t tell. “She jumped right in,” he said. “My first reaction was that’s awesome!” 

   The support and enthusiasm from her coach has played a big role in Sharar’s decision to take this leap. “Coach Haskovec and I have been talking about it for about a year now, and he’s really supportive of it,” said Sharar, who already knew Haskovec as a social studies teacher throughout junior high.

   By taking on the challenge and having no fear of being different, Sharar is proving to all of Hudson what her brother taught her: that you can do anything. The season may have just begun, but Sharar is already paving the way for future female wrestlers to take a chance and join the team.

   Said Sharar, “In the end, I’d really like to inspire other girls to do what they enjoy, even if it means stepping out of their comfort zone."